Alan Holdsworth g8oo ---- RESEARCH AND EXPERIMENTAL RADIO STATION

Health & Safety Risk Assessment

Station details:

Callsign/s used

  g8oo   (george 8 oscar oscar)

Date

23-02-2021

Description

Ham Radio risk assessment

Host

Alan Holdsworth (g8oo)

Location of event

Millfield, The Green
Brisley
Dereham
NR20 5LL

H&S Assessment

Alan Holdsworth (g8oo)

Risk assessments can be performed by someone with a reasonable ability to recognise some of the risks that prevail for the activity.

This Risk Assessment has been conducted by...


001

Alan Holdsworth

23/02/2021

Signed

Print Name

Date

This term shall mean anybody connected with the establishing, operating, or dis-mantling of the station or, any other event, that this risk assessment may cover.

 

General

HAZARD

WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?

HOW IS THE RISK CONTROLLED?

Visibility

Station team

During all erection and dismantling operations high visibility clothing and a hard hat will be worn by the teams performing the operations.

Poor illumination

Station team and members of the public.

A suitable, fully charged torch must be carried to enable safe working at night time (24 hour station operations).

Weather conditions

Station team and members of the public.

Suitable protection should be provided for the effects of sunburn.
Drink plenty of water and take regular rest breaks.
Antennas will not be erected when there is a possibility of thunderstorms in the vicinity.

 

Masts and Antennas

HAZARD

WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?

HOW IS THE RISK CONTROLLED?

Erection and dismantling of antennas

Erection Team and members of the public

One person will be put in charge of the antenna erection team.
All members of the antenna erection team must be briefed regarding antenna erection prior to the process starting.
The suitability of the ground will be assessed prior to the erection of the antennas.
The site will be clear of overhead cables.
The guy rope systems will be appropriate for the height and weight of the antenna/mast and will take in to account the effect of high winds on the structure.
All masts will be doubled guyed.
Gloves and safety footwear will be worn by the antenna erection team.
“Avoidance of danger from overhead power lines" – HSE publication GS6 (3rd edition) 1991 ISBN 0 11 885668 5
"Working safely near overhead power lines – Agricultural information sheet 8" Available from HSE.

Trip hazard on the antenna mast guy ropes.

Station team and members of the public.

During the erection of the mast and antennas:
Ground stakes will be appropriately marked.
Signs will be placed along the perimeter of the exclusion zone at regular intervals to warn the public not to cross into the exclusion zone.
Next to each sign will be placed a ‘Warning’ sign to remind station team, and other authorised persons, of the dangers of crossing in to the exclusion zone.

Falling metal work and antennas and masts during their erection and dismantling.

Station team and members of the public.

The area in which the antennas are being erected/dismantled will be marshalled to keep members of the public away from the site.
One event station team will be involved in erecting/dismantling the antennas. He & She will check to ensure that all securing bolts are tight and will hold the mast whilst  fixing the guy ropes.

Falling antennas and masts during the operation of the erection.

Station team and members of the public.

All antenna masts will be securely guyed using rope and fixtures whose specification exceeds the loading caused by winds of up to Beaufort Force 5.
All guy ropes will be checked immediately prior to installation and any found to have suffered chaffing will be replaced.
Wind speeds will be constantly assessed and the masts will be dismantled and the Station shut down when conditions dictate.
A method of measuring wind speed is recognized by the Metrological Office.
An exclusion zone will be marked out around the antennas in to which the antennas and masts can fall without fear of striking members of the public.
Signs will be placed along the perimeter of the exclusion zone at regular intervals to warn the public not to cross into the exclusion zone.
Next to each sign will be placed a ‘Warning’ sign to remind station team, and other authorised persons, of the dangers of crossing in to the exclusion zone.

Electrical shock hazard from touching the antennas.

Station team and members of the public.

Signs will be placed along the perimeter of the exclusion zone at regular intervals to warn the public not to cross into the exclusion zone.
Next to each ‘No Entry’ sign will be placed a ‘Warning’ sign to remind station team, and other authorised persons, of the dangers of crossing in to the exclusion zone.

Working at Height

HAZARD

WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?

HOW IS THE RISK CONTROLLED?

Falls

Station team

Working at height should be avoided where it is reasonably practicable.
As much work as possible must be undertaken from the ground, or a suitable stable surface where there is no danger of a fall.
Work at height must not take place when the weather is unsuitable (high winds, wet or icy surfaces, etc.)
Work at height must be properly planned, supervised and carried out by competent people.
Access to the work area must be able to be reached safely.
Equipment used should be suitable, stable and strong enough for the job.
Equipment used must be maintained and checked regularly.
Equipment must not be overloaded.
Station team must not overreach when working at height.
No operations should take place in the vicinity of fragile surfaces (roof lights, liner panels on built-up sheeted roofs, non-reinforced fibre cement sheets, corroded metal sheets, glass (including wired glass), rotted chipboard, slates and tiles).
An emergency evacuation and rescue procedure must be considered before undertaking work at height.
Materials must be stored safely so that they don’t cause injury if they are disturbed, or collapse.
"Working at Height – A Brief Guide" - HSE document INDG401 (rev 2)

Falling objects

Station team and members of the public

Protection must be put in place to provide protection from falling objects.
Materials must be stored safely so that they don’t cause injury if they are disturbed, or collapse.
"Working at Height – A Brief Guide" - HSE document INDG401 (rev 2)

Electricity Supplies & Generators

           HAZARD

WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?

HOW IS THE RISK CONTROLLED?

General

Station team

Generators should only be attended by those trained in their use.
Use of generators must be in compliance with the instructions and safety notes published in the manufacturer's manual.
The generator should be operated on a level surface.
Generators must have a suitable ground earth spike connected prior and during operation.
An RCD will be used to minimise the risk of electric shock at all times.
"Electrical Safety of Independent Low-Voltage AC. Portable and mobile generators and connected systems" - HSE document OC482/2

Electrical shock hazard from equipment when operating from a 240v AC power supply.

Station team and members of the public.

When using a generator, it will be earthed at the generator and the earth connection on the electrical supply will be checked to ensure that it is wired correctly.
The generator will be placed within the antenna exclusion zone to keep it away from members of the public.
When using a mains electricity supply, the earth of all 13A sockets will be tested to make sure that they are wired correctly.
The generator will be surrounded by a wind break and placed beneath a gazebo to prevent the generator from becoming wet during a rain storm.
Never operate generator with wet hands.
Examine all power leads and plugs for damage.
Look for signs of overheating (burn or scorch marks).
Ensure correctly rated fuses are fitted to plugs for the load applied.
Ensure no bare wires are visible from connectors or sockets.
Ensure all terminal connections are tight. Where appropriate ensure that mains operated equipment is PAT tested for safety compliance.

Carbon monoxide poisoning

Station team and members of the public.

Ensure generators are at least 1 meter away from any building, tent, vehicle etc.
Generators will be placed and run in well ventilated locations.
Generators will not be run indoors.

Fire

Station team and members of the public.

Fuel will be kept at least 10m away from the generator when it is in use.
Fuel should be kept in an authorised and clearly marked container.
Generators will not be refuelled with the motor running.
Generators will be left for twenty minutes and allowed to cool down before refuelling takes place.
Naked flames will not be allowed within 20m of any fuel source.
A suitable fire extinguisher will be located nearby.

Trip Hazards

HAZARD

WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?

HOW IS THE RISK CONTROLLED?

Trip hazard from trailing cables.

Station team and members of the public.

All cables within the Station operating area will be routed so as to ensure that nobody can trip over them.
Where cables have to cross a floor area of the operating area, they will be routed through insulated rubber bridges, specifically designed for the task, or sunk in the ground.
Where it is essential to route cables / feeders along walkways ensure they are taped securely to floors or walls.
Antenna cables/feeders must have a suitable point of entry into building, tent, vehicle etc.
Ensure cables/feeders do not impede access/egress through doorways, emergency exits etc.
Antenna cables within the antenna exclusion zone will not be covered as the exclusion zone is designed to keep people out of the area. The ‘Warning’ signs will remind station team and other authorised persons of the trip hazard within the exclusion zone.

Portable Risk of Fire

HAZARD

WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?

HOW IS THE RISK CONTROLLED?

Fire in the tent

Station team and members of the public.

A fire extinguisher will be kept inside the tent to deal with electrical fires. 
A fire blanket will be kept inside the tent to deal with kitchen area fires.
Two exits are to be maintained within the tent to ensure everyone can get out as quickly as possible.

Motor vehicles

HAZARD

WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?

HOW IS THE RISK CONTROLLED?

Installing radio equipment in motor vehicles

Station team

Batteries should be correctly vented to prevent gas build up.
Batteries should be secured to prevent spillage.
All connectors and cables should be adequately protected.
The termination of flexible cables should be free from strain.
Mobile radio equipment should be connected to a power supply by an appropriate fused link.
Radio equipment should be secure.

Moving vehicles

Station team

Wear high-visibility clothing.
The loading and unloading of equipment from vehicles must take place in clearly designated areas.

Equipment Handling

HAZARD

WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?

HOW IS THE RISK CONTROLLED?

Personal injury from the handling and lifting of equipment.

Station team

Before lifting any equipment the operator should assess the equipment to be lifted.
Where possible, a lifting aid should be used if the operator feels that the equipment will be too heavy to lift on their own.
Where a lifting aid is not available, the operator will seek the assistance of other Station team.
Where additional Station team are not available, the operator will seek to reduce the weight of item to be lifted.
The operator will adopt a suitable stable position during the lift.
The operator will seek to clear the path to be taken before attempting the lift and carry procedure.
The maximum weight to be lifted by a woman to elbow height is 13Kg and 20Kg for a man.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg143.pdf

Station team’s legal responsibilities

Members of the Station team have general legal duties to take reasonable care of themselves, and others who may be affected by their actions, and to co-operate with the health and safety duties and requirements to be complied with.
The law says that members of the Station team must:

Report any safety hazard they identify to the Quantum Technology Club;

Use the equipment and safety devices supplied or given to them properly, in accordance with any training and instructions (unless they think that would be unsafe, in which case they should seek further instructions before continuing).

Members of the Station team (either directly or via safety representatives), in good time, on health and safety matters.

Risks arising from their work;

Proposals to manage and/or control these risks;

The best ways of providing information and training.

The Station team and their representatives what they think the hazards are, as they may notice things that are not obvious and may have some good, practical ideas on how to control the risks.

     

Alan Holdsworth g8oo ---- RESEARCH AND EXPERIMENTAL RADIO STATION